Stephen Ausherman

LAND/ART PROJECTS AT THE OPEN SPACE VISITOR CENTER ABQ

LAND/ART is a collaborative state-wide project hosted by numerous New Mexico arts organizations, all organized by the 516 Gallery in Albuquerque and running through the summer and fall of 2009. Focusing on “environmental” or “land” art, the collaboration seeks to address our changing relationship to nature, and to offer new or previously unconsidered understandings of the place in which we live. The months-long project with culminate with a book, published by Radius Books and available in December, 2009. Several ongoing installations are on view at The Open Space Visitor Center in Albuquerque, NM.

Video still from the Kammer 2.1 series, by Stephen Ausherman on view through August 31, 2009.

Recipient of a New Visions Award from the New Mexico Film Office, Kammer 2.1 is an interactive video-art display that provides non-traditional interpretations of Open Space and other public lands. It is located in the Visitor Center reception area.

Big Bertha, 2008, ink on paper from A Peculiar Hush byDanielle Rae Miller, through August 29, 2009

Susan Gutt, Standing, 2006, willow, salt cedar, cane; right, Wave, 2008, bamboo, willow, cane

An Installation of dead wood tree branches from the Bosque and light and shadow-play inside the Open Space Visitor Center. Viewers will encounter a physical “painting” in the space around them as the shadows of the branches move, play and mingle with their own.

Gathered & Woven, Nan Simpson: Botanical Watercolors and Susan Gutt: Basketweavings of Indigenous New Mexico Flora, on view until August 27, 2009. There will be a reception Saturday, August 1st, 1–4 pm. Nan Simpson and Susan Gutt have been brought together due to the incredible sensitivity and skill they use when approaching the indigenous and exotic flora that is found in the rich state of New Mexico. These two artists often find themselves seeking out the function or art of the many plants that grow in the desert Southwest.

Another Open Space Visitor Center exhibition this summer focuses on the work of Basia Irland, entitled Reading Rivers: Books, Scrolls & Manuscripts. The show includes images from the Gathering of Waters projects which connect communities along the length of rivers and a selection of carved wooden books coated with an ecological “text” and scrolls from the Waterborne Disease series, depicting various pathogens. Author Lynn Cline writes, “Irland’s sculpted books possess a language of their won, a lyrical and ecological poetry that speaks volumes about the mysteries of nature and the inextricable links between humans and the environment.”

Reception with a talk by the artist on Saturday, August 1, 1–4 pm.